Windows-specific rights can grant users privileged access

In general, you use the default Windows Login role for most users during the initial deployment to prevent disruptions in user access. You can then define custom roles to add specialized access rights to grant users additional privileges in a controlled manner.

For Windows computers, these specialized access rights are:

  • Desktop access rights enable users to create additional working environments and run applications in that desktop with their own credentials but as a member of an Active Directory or built-in group. Users who are assigned to a role with desktop rights can switch from their default desktop to a desktop with administrator privileges without having to enter an Administrator password. With a desktop right, users can also run any application from their default desktop using a selected role and credentials without opening a new desktop.
  • Application access rights enable users to run specific local applications as another user or as a member of an Active Directory or built-in group. Users who are assigned to a role with application rights can log on with their normal Active Directory credentials and run a specific application using a role with elevated privileges without having to enter the service account or Administrator password.
  • Network access rights enable users to connect to a remote computer as another user or as a member of an Active Directory or built-in group to perform operations, such as start and stop services, that require administrative privileges on the remote computer. Users who are assigned to a role with network access rights can perform administrative operations on a remote server using a role with elevated privileges that only applies to the operations performed on the network computer without having to enter the service account or Administrator password. You can use zones to control who can connect and perform tasks on remote computers and what their elevated privileges allow them to do.