Roles grant different types of access rights

There are three types of access rights that an administrator can add to any role you might be assigned:

Type of access right What a role with this type of right allows you to do

Desktop

If you have been assigned a role that grants a desktop right, you can create a separate desktop on your computer to run applications as yourself but with the elevated privileges associated with a specific Active Directory or built-in group.

In most cases, an administrator assigns you a role with a desktop right if you have more than one local application for which you need elevated privileges and you need to use those privileges frequently. For example, if you use several administrative applications on a daily basis, you are likely to be assigned a role that has a desktop right.

Note: On Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 systems, task bar menus are not available in an Elevated Desktop.

Application

If you have been assigned a role that grants an application right, you can run a specific application with the elevated privileges associated with a specific user account or as yourself but with the elevated privileges associated with a specific Active Directory or built-in group.

In most cases, an administrator assigns you a role with an application right if you have only occasional administrative responsibilities for a specific application or only need temporary use of the elevated privileges.

Network access

If you have been assigned a role that grants a network access right, you can connect to a remote computer as an account with privileges on that computer.

In most cases, an administrator assigns you a role with a network access right if you need to take administrative action on a remote server. This access right does not change any of your privileges on your local computer.

Every role includes one or more rights. Depending on the roles you have been assigned, you might have one or more of these access rights available.